Cornelius Van Vorst, ca.1620; 
Jersey City Free Public Library; Grover Cleveland Political Cartoon; 
Grover Cleveland Birthplace Historical Site Collection Peter Lee, former slave, ca.1880; 
Hoboken Historical Photographs Collection; Farm Map of Hillsboro, Somerset County, 1860; 
Historical Maps of New Jersey Collection; Bathing Beauties, 1890-1930; 
American Labor Museum/Botto House National Landmark Collection; Flag Salute, 1950; 
Seabrook Farms Collection;

Cigarette Ads and Slogans
One of the biggest advertisers of the early twentieth century and through the 1980's was the cigarette industry. Even at an early stage of the use of cigarettes people knew that they caused irritation of the throat but they had no idea of the long-term effects. In the first half of the twentieth century cigarette companies used the appeal of so called experts to endorse their products and even went so far as to say that their product was less irritating than their competitors. Below is and example of a cigarette ad and slogans from the 1930's.
Cigarette slogan sheet from 1930-1946
After viewing both the ad and the slogans draw comparisons between cigarette ads of today and the early twentieth century?
In fact it had been proven that smoking my cause a persistent cough but companies only used these symptoms do their advantage. Look at the following slogans: "Not a cough in a carload" (Chesterfield); "Not a single case of throat irritation due to smoking Camels"; "Smoking’s more fun when you’re not worried by throat irritation or smoker’s cough" (Philip Morris); "Remember Juleps, forget your cough" or "Cause no ills" (Chesterfield); and "Why risk sore throats?" (Old Gold), to name a few.
Question
  1. What senses are the above ad appealing to? Explain when this ad might have been more effective and why?
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